171218 Obesity 2/2

171218 Obesity 2/2

Obesity poses a serious threat to our health and occurs when the overall amount of calories consumed exceeds the calories expended. Per the accepted definition, obesity is an excessively high proportion of body fat in relation to lean body mass on an individual.

If your child is between two and five years old and they are overweight or worse yet, obese, there is sufficient reason to be taking additional health related to steps to reduce their body fat.

Consult with your pediatrician and work together to stabilize and then reduce the level of body fat in your child. The suggestions may include a healthier diet with an ample selection of fruits, grains, milk, vegetables, and non-sugary fruit drinks along with exercise or physical activity.

You can start by going to the USDA MyPyramid site here at http://teamnutrition.usda.gov/resources/mpk_close.pdf to see for yourself what a healthy diet consists of for your child.

Help your child grow healthy and live a life that is not consumed by potentially avoidable medical problems.

101218 Obesity 1/2

101218 Obesity 1/2

Obesity, as stated earlier, poses a serious threat to our health and occurs when the overall amount of calories consumed exceeds the calories expended.

Obesity, per the accepted definition, is an excessively high proportion of body fat in relation to lean body mass on an individual. Another common indicator of obesity is a mathematical chart comparison of weight with height. These graphs use a standard of acceptable or desirable weight when compared to the height of the person measured.

The body mass index is one of the most frequently used measures to determine a healthy weight. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention uses a mathematical formula. These calculations divide the person’s weight in pounds by the square of the person’s height in inches. The answer is then multiplied by 703.

There are also formulas that use the metric system.

However, this formula does not take into account the lean muscle mass on the person, so if one is heavily muscled the BMI will inaccurate.

When children are born, they have extra fat. This helps them make an easier transition from the womb into the outside world. As they approach five years of age both body fat and body weight are at the lowest points of their lives.

031218 Childhood obesity 2/2

031218 Childhood obesity 2/2

Health care and fitness professionals throughout the United States and other affluent nations are increasingly alarmed at the growing epidemic of childhood obesity. This upward spiral of obesity, diabetes, and heart disease demands immediate attention if changes in these unhealthy trends are to be reversed. Perhaps a quick look at the problem will set the tone for action.

Parents set the example. If one parent is obese, the child has a fifty percent chance of also being obese. This increases thirty percent up to eighty percent when both parents are obese. This kid doesn’t have a chance under these circumstances.

Obesity brings on the added risk of diabetes later on in life. For those born in 2000, a potential diagnosis of type 2 diabetes exists in thirty percent of the boys and forty percent for the girls during their life span.

The sad part is this situation can be dramatically altered simply by exercising or engaging in physical activity every day. However, we don’t because we have to watch our favorite show, play on the computer, eat fast food, rather than cook a healthy meal, drink pop and sugar filled fake fruit juices, ride instead of walk, use the escalator in lieu of the stairs….

In the education system, we have less than eight percent of our elementary and less than seven percent of our middle and high schools requiring daily physical education for the students. It should not be up to the schools to get the kids active, sure, it helps, but the main responsibility lies within the family unit. The modeling takes place at home. If the parents are inactive, overweight, and obese the chances are great, the kids will be too.

261118 Childhood obesity-1/2

261118 Childhood obesity-1/2

Health care and fitness professionals throughout the United States and other affluent nations are increasingly alarmed at the growing epidemic of childhood obesity. This upward spiral of obesity, diabetes, and heart disease demands immediate attention if changes in these unhealthy trends are to be reversed. Perhaps a quick look at the problem will set the tone for action.

The National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) states that more than nine million of our children are overweight. Obesity in our 2-6 year old preschool children, and adolescents, 12-19 years old has doubled since the 1970’s. This rate has tripled in the 6-11 year olds!

Unfortunately, similar increases have occurred within the adult population during this nearly four-decade period.

We are not active enough to ward off this onslaught of health problems as evidenced by the fact that over half of the 12-21 year olds do not regularly engage in vigorous activity or exercise. Some blame the television or computer. The statistics are clear that overweight and obese children watch more television or play on the computer more than their healthier and lower weight peers.

Not only are these kids fatter but 7% of them suffer from sleep apnea when their breathing temporarily stops or is suspended briefly periodically throughout the night. This causes a lack of restful sleep that continues to accumulate. Loss of sleep upsets the hormonal balances within the body. These hormones regulate body fat levels.

191118 The signs of metabolic health

191118 The signs of metabolic health

One of the best signs of a person’s metabolic health is the size of their waistline. When the first thing someone notices about you is your gut, then you have a health problem. A larger waistline is indicative of this deeper lying visceral fat.

For those of you considering liposuction, this procedure makes only cosmetic changes. It removes the subcutaneous fat but does nothing about the deep fat surrounding your organs.

Since one of the criteria for the metabolic syndrome is a big waist, it may be helpful to know what is considered to be a big waist. For men, a waistline over 40 inches is excessive and for women this number is 35 inches. Anything over these two numbers is too much and predisposes that person to the metabolic syndrome.

111118 Rembering the Veterans

Today is the day our Country pauses to honor the veterans who gave their lives protecting our freedoms.

Thank you to all of my fellow Vets…it is an honor to be associated with each one of you. I salute you for your service to the United States of America.

121118 Carbohydrates, triglyceride levels and the size of your waist

121118 Carbohydrates, triglyceride levels and the size of your waist

The modern American consumes approximately fifty percent of their daily calories from carbohydrate sources. These high carb diets signal the liver to create more of the previously mentioned Triglyceride rich particles. If the diet includes more than sixty to sixty five carbohydrates then this process increases.

Diets that are high in sugar, fructose being the main cause of the problem, raise the triglyceride levels and in turn stimulate production of triglyceride particles that are rich in very low-density lipoproteins (VLDL).

As this substance goes through the bloodstream it loses some of the triglycerides, which eventually ends up as cholesterol loaded with a high concentration of LDL. We know that approximately sixty to eighty percent of the cholesterol coming into the artery wall is from LDL, the rest comes from Chylomicrons and VLDL.

Doctors and research scientists also know that people with high levels of LDL are at an increased risk for a heart attack and that lowering these levels can reduce the same risk. As of now, they do not have the research data to confirm whether lowering the level of triglycerides will do the same thing.

They do know that having both, high levels of LDL and triglycerides, is a heart attack in the making. Women with high triglyceride numbers seem to have a stronger link with heart disease than men do with the same numbers. Why this predictor is not valid for men is unknown at this time.

 

051118 Sport and lifestyle activity-range of motion exercising

051118 Sport and lifestyle activity-range of motion exercising

Your joints and muscles are meant to function within standardized degrees of movement, commonly referred to as the range of motion (ROM). The stronger you are within these ranges, the better protected you will be in preventing injuries from occurring. Therefore when doing your exercise routine keep in mind the following two guidelines:

  1. You gain the most strength within the range of motion (ROM) at which you exercise.
  2. The smaller the range of motion you in the joint, the less will be the carry over strength throughout the rest of the movement.

The basis of every quality strength training or fitness program relies, in part, on these two premises. As an example, let’s look at the squat while explaining these principles.

Many lifters do short range squats, known as high squats, in the gym. They get into a machine or in rare cases under a bar and drop down a few inches and call it good. In many instances this isn’t even to a parallel position, let alone below parallel where they should be before starting back up again. Depending on the load of the bar or on the machine, strength may be increased within this small range of motion but its unlikely this will happen.

This range of movement is too little and does not support normal living activities such as sitting down in a chair and then getting back up. If the strength is not developed within a range that is vital to living an active lifestyle then it is not useful. This group of fitness enthusiasts would be better served by going deeper in their squats, thereby getting a transfer of useable strength into their daily lives. This naturally leads in to the second principle.

An individual or strength athlete will become stronger when training the full range of motion. This expands the strength curve and transfers more useable muscle activity across greater degrees of the joint angle. Greater degree angles of strength protect the joint from injury, especially at the far ranges of motion.

The take home message is don’t cut yourself short with limited range of motion exercises.

Training theories 291018 5/5

Training theories 291018 5/5

Two models of thought predominate the current thinking in strength training. One is ‘supercompensation’ or the one-factor theory, the second is the ‘fitness-fatigue’, also known as the two-factor theory. These two are generalized theories and as such contain only the most essential portions of the training ideas. Extraneous options are not included in this brief snap shot of these two training programs.

A rough rule of thumb with a normal training load is the duration of the fitness gains and the impact of fatigue differ by a factor of three. That is the fatigue effect is three times shorter than the positive effects, which last up to three times longer. As an example if the effects of fatigue last 24 hours, the improvement in fitness lasts 72 hours.

Using the two factor model the coach must keep in mind the two offsetting components of training and plan each follow up session accordingly. Maintenance of preparedness, avoidance of fatigue and continual training sessions comprised of several warm up type sessions prior to a contest. The idea behind this is to decrease the training load during each session rather than reduce the number of training sessions. A tapering off of the training load has been proven to enhance the final strength outcome.

In order to accomplish this feat the intervals between sessions must be long enough so the “negative traces of the preceding workout pass out of existence but the positive fitness gains persists.” This has become a rather popular model for use in planning strength training programs.

Training theories 221018 4/5

Training theories 221018 4/5

Two models of thought predominate the current thinking in strength training. One is ‘supercompensation’ or the one-factor theory, the second is the ‘fitness-fatigue’, also known as the two-factor theory. These two are generalized theories and as such contain only the most essential portions of the training ideas. Extraneous options are not included in this brief snap shot of these two training programs.

Two factor theory (Fitness-fatigue theory)

This “theory of training is much more sophisticated than the supercompensation theory”. Its basis is the premise “that preparedness, characterized by the athlete’s potential sport potential performance is not stable but rather varies with time. There are two components of the athlete’s preparedness:

Those that are slow changing, for example, physical fitness is a slow changing phenomenon. It does not change a substantial amount over short periods of minutes, hours or even days.
Fast changing such as physical fatigue (a temporary lowered ability to work because of disturbed homeostasis resulting from performing this work ), illness, the athlete’s disposition toward competition, intellectual, and sensory inputs may all change quickly.

According to this theory, the immediate effect of the training is a combination of two processes:

  1. The gain in the fitness which was prompted by the workout
  2. Fatigue resulting from the workout

The sum of the two effects is an increase in fitness due to the workout that is offset by a deterioration of fitness due to fatigue. The outcome is a balancing act of positive and negative actions within the body. If the fitness increase is greater than the effects of fatigue, the organism grows stronger. If not the opposite is true.