Explosivelyfit Strength Training

Explosivelyfit strength training builds powerful bodies!

Archive for the category “muscle mass”

130617 Exercise suggestions for increasing bone mineral density

130617 Exercise suggestions for increasing bone mineral density

Before engaging in any new exercise program consult with your primary health care provider.

To increase your lean body mass, add strength and power, follow these guidelines for the suggested group of exercises:

1. Full body resistance training program on a schedule of at least two times per week, with three times to optimize the results.
2. Utilize correct exercise technique at all times
3. Three sets of ten to twelve repetitions each exercise unless otherwise noted.
4. Work to rest ratio is 1:2, meaning if you work out for ten seconds you then rest for twenty seconds.
5. If you are able to add weight after completing the series three times, then do so the next session.
6. If you have added weight then do only ten repetitions and work up to twelve.

Warm up for 5-8 minutes
Squats
Calf raises
Dead lifts
Military presses
Shoulder shrugs
Abdominal work-15-20 reps for two sets
Bench presses
Bar bell rows
Barbell curls
Triceps extensions
Abdominal work again to end the session-15-20 reps for two sets

 

060617 Mechanical load consists of the following:

060617 Mechanical load consists of the following:

Magnitude of force

Magnitude of the load density or the intensity of the load will generally be above eighty to ninety percent one to ten repetition maximum in order to see improvements in the tissue response.

Speed of force development

The rate or speed of loading means how fast the force is being applied to move the load in a concentric muscle contraction (force applied against a weight with the muscles shortening). Think speed during the lift.

The direction of forces

Varying the direction and pattern of movement will stress the bone and the attaching musculature. Full range of motion in all exercises ensures to a certain extent that the forces are applied as required.

Volume of force applied

The first three mentioned above are primarily responsible for bone mineral improvements. Typically the repetitions do not need to exceed thirty to thirty five to see improvements IF the load is within the correct intensity zone (80%-90% 1-10RM).

Exercise prescriptions for bone growth stimulation*

  1. Volume 10 reps for 3-6 sets
    2. Load 1-10 RM at 80%-90%
    3. Rest 1-4 minutes between sets
    4. Variation Undulating periodization patterns
    5. Exercise selection Structural, multi-joint, large muscle groups

    *Essentials of Strength Training and Conditioning
    Baechle, T. R., Earle, R.W. Human Kinetics 2001

Summary:

The greater the magnitude or intensity, the higher and faster the power output, and the direction of force all contribute to the successful laying down of new bone growth.

101216 The benefits of resistance training

101216 The benefits of resistance training

A lifestyle of activity provides ongoing lifelong benefits for many people. Amongst these favorable side effects are reductions in high blood pressure and cholesterol levels. Using our muscles helps in staving off osteopenia and osteoporosis by engendering positive changes in bone mineral density. This, along with a higher level of lean body mass leads to healthier body composition figures, i.e. more lean muscle and lowered adipose or fat tissue in the body.

For those who are finding it difficult to stay at a healthy body weight, strength training may be another method of control. It has been noted that muscle is more metabolically active than fat which means more calories are burned if you have more muscle mass compared to fat tissue.

A greater percentage of lean muscle mass brings with it increased feelings of self esteem, greater self confidence and certainly contributes to a much more positive body image.

Now that a few of the recognized benefits have been listed, it’s time to get started planning your strength training program.

Misguided, but well intentioned, people go out and buy an expensive, supposedly multipurpose machine. Those who do generally find that it doesn’t fit them, is uncomfortable to use, is too big, too cumbersome or worse yet hurts them. Simply put they would have been better off spending their money on a set of free weights, a bench and knowledgeable coach to guide them along for a few months. A small set of weights consisting off a couple hundred pounds, a sturdy bench and coaching sessions would set them back less than the high priced ineffective machine that ultimately will end up in the garage or basement and then in a garage sale.

Free weights provide endless opportunities to exercise. They create greater strength gains because of increased muscle fiber recruitment brought on by having to maintain the movement of the bar in its path instead of allowing the machine do it for you. Using free weights permits full range of movement during the exercise. This motion is unencumbered by the limitations of a machine and makes for unimpeded progress. Using free weights increases the range of motion helps to maintain flexibility in the joints.

Additional benefits of free weight set ups are greater personalized accommodation to individual body structure differences such as height, weight, torso types, limb length and joint mobility. Free weights mandate greater skill development in balance and coordination which are vitally important to leading an active life.

Probably one of the most important reasons to strength train is the fact that it will help to decrease fatigue brought on from daily living activities.

As we age the sense of balance gradually diminishes along with our agility, coordination and overall body awareness. All of which are leading causes that contribute to falls, injury and fractures. A healthy body plays a significant role in preventing injury and if injured then in the rehabilitation of that injury.

Many individuals who participate in sports find the stronger and more physically fit they become, the better their athleticism on the field.

If the choice is made to buy your own weights and get started, then it incumbent upon you to get a medical check up and discuss this exercise option with your doctor before starting out on your own to greater fitness.

Remember to have a spotter for over head, on the back or over the face lifts such as the military press squat or military press exercises. Of course if you decide to perform heavy lifting then a spotter should also be an essential part of your lifting program. Always use correct technique, lift safely, sensibly and smart.

121116 Exercise suggestions for those with limited equipment

121116 Exercise suggestions for those with limited equipment

Make a space to work out in that is easy to get to. Get all of your gear in one spot so it is available for immediate use without moving a lot of stuff around each time.

Equipment

  • Bicycle
  • Dumbbells
  • Treadmill
  • Stability ball

Set up the dumbbells in 5, 10, 15, and 20 pound sets. Make sure the collars are on tight and the weights are centered on each one.

The warm up

Begin on the treadmill or your bike at the low end of each of the times. Start out at a walk for 1-2 minutes. As your pulse becomes faster increase the speed and work up to a fast walk or slight jog for another 2-3 minutes. Now slow to a walk for another 1-2 minutes. As you become stronger these times will seem awfully low, once that happens then add 10-25% more to each of them. At some point you will find the ideal warm up time that just feels right for your needs.

Leg rotations

Move your legs in giant circles, forward and backward and then out to the sides. Hold onto something sturdy if you are unsure of your balance. Gradually you’ll want to do these without support to enhance your balance capabilities.

Shoulder series

Do each one of the following 15-20 times each.

  • Wide clockwise circles with outstretched arms.
  • Wide counter clockwise circles with outstretched arms
  • Arms straight to the sides with palms facing the body moving out front and back over head without bending them
  • Arms bent at 90° and then extended rapidly to the front and back to the 90° starting position
  •  Arms bent at 90° and then extended rapidly to the front and back to the 90° starting position

The exercises This is just a minute fraction of the ones that are available.

Column one Column two Column three Column four
  • Dumbbell Military presses
  • Chin ups or pull downs
  • Dumbbell floor presses
  • Dumbbell rows
  • One arm dumbbell rows
  • Dumbbell bench Squats
  • Wall squats
  • Dumbbell dead lifts
  • Dumbbell good mornings
  • Dumbbell side bends
  • Leg Raises
  • Straight leg/stiff leg dead lifts
  • Dumbbell curls
  • Dumbbell Triceps extensions
  • Dumbbell Wrist curls-flexion and extension
  • Thors hammer wrist deviations

.

  • Dumbbell Calf raises
  • Abdominal exercises of your choice

The schedule

Work out five times a week for fifteen to twenty minutes a day. Each day will be a different series of exercises that you choose to do. Start out by doing two sets of eight repetitions with a rest of 30 seconds between each set. Gradually increase up to four to five sets of eight as your conditioning improves. Work quickly but without throwing the weight around. Let your muscles do the work instead of momentum.

Keep your pulse up in the 70-80% target heart rate (THR) range as you exercise. This is found by taking your age from 220 and multiplying the result by 70-80%. Although this is a very common method of finding your THR it is also somewhat inaccurate because the outcomes may be off by as much as 10 percent plus or minus.

Begin your exercise session with the warm up, move onto your choice of exercises from columns one, three and four and then cool down with a few selected static stretches.

The second day of exercise begins again with the warm up and your selections from columns two and four. Follow this with your cool down and you are done for the day. The week ends can be days off or walking for fun sessions. Add weight as these become easier to do each day. The heavier you lift, the stronger you’ll become. The greater your muscle mass the higher will be your calorie expenditures each day.

Schedule sample

Day one from column one, three and four

  •  Dumbbell military presses
  •  Dumbbell curls
  •  Abdominal exercise
  •  Calf raises

Day two from column two and four

  •  Dumbbell bench squats
  •  Dumbbell good mornings
  •  Abdominal exercise
  •  Calf raises

Day three from column one, three and four

  •  Dumbbell military presses
  •  Dumbbell curls
  •  Abdominal exercise
  •  Calf raises

Day four from column two and four

  •  Dumbbell bench squats
  •  Dumbbell good mornings
  •  Abdominal exercise
  •  Calf raises

Day five from column one, three and four

  •  Dumbbell military presses
  •  Dumbbell curls
  •  Abdominal exercise
  •  Calf raises

Week end off

Day one from column two and four

  •  Dumbbell bench squats
  •  Dumbbell good mornings
  •  Abdominal exercise
  •  Calf raises

Day two from column one, three and four

  •  Dumbbell military presses
  •  Dumbbell curls
  •  Abdominal exercise
  •  Calf raises

Day three from column two and four

  •  Dumbbell bench squats
  •  Dumbbell good mornings
  •  Abdominal exercise
  •  Calf raises

Day four from column one, three and four

  •  Dumbbell military presses
  •  Dumbbell curls
  •  Abdominal exercise
  •  Calf raises

Day five from column two and four

  •  Dumbbell bench squats
  •  Dumbbell good mornings
  •  Abdominal exercise
  •  Calf raises

You will notice that each week emphasizes more of one part of your body by doing either upper or lower torso exercises three times instead of two sessions per week.

241016 It is never too late to strength train

241016 It is never too late to strength train

There are numerous studies showing that people who do resistance training have significantly improved their muscle strength and performance. These changes show up in as little as two months. This held true even with the frail and over age 80 population. Not only does resistance training improve strength it can also help prevent and treat sarcopenia.

According to an analysis conducted in 2010 by the Aging and Research Reviews, strenuous, intense workouts are the most effective. You can bet they did not use soup cans in these intense workouts. However, if you are seriously out of condition you probably will have to start out gradually. Find a qualified strength trainer, one with good credentials from a nationally recognized association, and get started.

In order to help prevent or treat sarcopenia, strength train regularly and make sure that you are getting enough protein and your system on a daily basis.

A basic strength program stressing the major muscle groups, consisting of three sets of eight repetitions, performed 2 to 3 times a week will show increases in strength and functionality within a short period. These targeted muscle groups should involve the shoulders, arms, upper back, chest, abdominals, lower back, the quads and hamstrings of the legs and the calves.

Begin with a warm-up with some sort of an aerobic exercise to the point where you are breathing heavier, your pulse is going faster and you have a slight sweat. Now it is time to start lifting.

Begin with the weight that you can handle 10 to 12 times. In over the course of a week or so add weight until the last two repetitions of the set are difficult. Rest 2 minutes and repeat the exercise set again. If you’re able to complete three sets of eight repetitions with a specific weight then that weight is to light and more needs to be added to the bar.

On the days that you are not strength training, do some sort of aerobic exercise for 20 to 30 minutes. Keep track of what you’re doing. You are going to notice improvements in your strength level and in your ability to move a lot easier in your daily life.

101016 Gaining muscle with electrical impulses, fact, or fiction

101016 Gaining muscle with electrical impulses, fact, or fiction

Periodically one sees an advertisement for an electrical device that supposedly builds muscles or helps someone to lose weight. Without a doubt, some types of electrical stimulation are beneficial, however; the gains in the muscles are miniscule. The medically approved electrical stimulation devices used in a physical therapy setting or after a surgery to control pain work well. The tens unit comes immediately to mind.

The repeated low intensity shocks produced by these electrical devices can force rapid contractions of the muscles. This repeated stimulation does cause a certain amount of growth in the muscle fibers but even the best of these devices, as used in the medical field, can do only so much. They help to partially stave off muscle atrophy during the rehabilitation.

In order to gain muscle size, strength, and to burn enough calories to lose weight, exercise is a critical part of the equation. Without exercise, these devices are practically useless, especially the ones seen on TV.

One popular, regularly advertised, model found that the stimulation of the major muscles of the abdomen, arms, and legs for up to 45 minutes, three times a week for a full two months produced no significant changes in the participants strength levels, body fat ratio to lean muscle mass, weight , or their overall appearance.

The recommendation from most astute observers is to regularly exercise and follow a sound nutritious diet because getting stronger, bigger, and losing weight does not come with an electrical machine. You actually have to be active and watch what you eat and drink.

031016 An introduction into strength and power training for all ages

031016 An introduction into strength and power training for all ages

It turns out there are effective actions you can do to positively alter your health. They can help improve your blood sugar and cholesterol levels, help improve your mood, make you stronger and more powerful, and at the same time make your bones stronger to help ward off fractures.

These are not the only benefits these actions, not by a long shot.

They can potentially help you avoid disability, frailty and retain that precious independence we all want to have as we age.

Strength training can do all of this.

It is a well-known fact that strength training offers all of the benefits previously mentioned, in addition to many others such as are listed in the following section from the Harvard Medical School.

“Practically any regular exercise benefits your health. Strength training specifically helps in the following ways:

Strengthens muscles

Strengthens bones

Prevents falls and fractures by improving balance and preserving power to correct missteps

Helps to control blood sugar

Relieves some of the load carried by the heart

Improves cholesterol levels

Improves the body’s ability to pluck oxygen and nutrients from the blood stream

Boosts metabolism even while sleeping and thus helps keep weight within a healthy range

Prevents or eases lower back pain

Relieves arthritis pain and expands limited range of motion

Raises confidence , brightens mood, and helps fight mild to moderate depression

Wards off loss of independence by keeping muscles strong enough for routine tasks”

According to the Center for Disease Control (CDC) there is now a heightened awareness of the benefits of strength training. There is also the fact that only a small percentage of the American population have actually started a strength training program. This percentage is estimated at just slightly under 22% for men and 18% of the women in our nation who are strength training twice a week on a regular basis.

This percentage figure is way below the U.S. governments Healthy People 2010 goal of 30% of the adults in America who make strength training a part of their exercise program.

If you’ve never lifted weights before or done any type of resistance training the biggest barrier to starting may be knowing where to begin. This may be your situation, if so all you need to start is a comfortable pair of shoes and clothing. Adding to this, a solidly built chair, a few dumbbells and if you’re able to skip rope, a skip rope. This is all you need to get started. There, that wasn’t so difficult was it?

Since the health benefits of strength training are founded on its ability to protect against the onslaught of frailty, while at the same time making everyday tasks easier and more manageable it is essential that you begin sooner rather than later. The longer you wait the more your muscle tissue, bone density, and strength dwindle. If you don’t do something about your strength and power abilities you will soon find it difficult to walk upstairs, get up from a chair, carry groceries, and fend for yourself as an independent person.

Not only will you find it difficult to do the aforementioned tasks but also lacking strength leads to falls and that can mean incapacitating fractures. This in turn further compromises your ability to lead an active life. Strength training has a wealth of research backing its ability to effectively slow down and possibly reverse these life altering events.

Even if you are in your 70s, 80s, 90s and above, research has shown a dramatic increase in strength, power, agility, and mobility within 10 weeks of lifting weights 2 to 3 times a week. Now you have to admit that this is not a tremendous time commitment, especially considering the benefits to your health.

011016 Three, ultraconservative, exercise progression systems

011016 Three, ultraconservative, exercise progression systems

Strength training has lived and breathed progressive overload for many, many years. Today, strength coaches may use any of the three following methods for just a few days out of the year. Even used during this limited amount of time, they serve their purpose and that is to recover from an injury or to act as an active rest in the most effective and efficient manner possible.

In 1948, DeLorme and Watkins devised the first progressive strength training system. This protocol was used for quite some time with the rehabilitation of military personnel. In 1951, Dr. Zinovieff, working in England’s United Oxford hospitals revised the DeLorme program and then renamed it the Oxford technique. Both of these overload systems were still being into the latter 1900’s, in this case, 1985. In that year, the Daily Adjusted Progressive Resistive Exercise (DAPRE) technique arrived on the scene.

The DAPRE is a more complex way of exercise programming when compared with the other two. It is also a highly effective method of strength training for the dedicated new trainee.

An obvious difference between the previous two strength progression programs and the DAPRE system is a number of repetitions used for the three sets. DeLorme and Watkins and the Oxford technique both use 10 repetitions for the three sets. The DAPRE begins with 10 repetitions on the first set at 50% and lowers the reps to six on the second set at 75%.

The reason for bringing this up is the percentages for a 10-repetition maximum are on a continuum between 30 and 75% with a heavy intensity of effort expected on each set. Since there was no mention of the length of the rest periods between each of the sets, common sense would lead one to believe that thirty to one hundred and fifty seconds would be appropriate.

You might notice that none of the reps or set combination recommendations coincides even in the slightest to Prilephin’s table. Therefore, these three program designs may best be used during an active recovery phase for probably not more than two or three days. Once these three days have passed then it would be best to get back onto a powerful strength-building program.

Three, ultraconservative, exercise progression systems

Let us look at each of these programs in a little more detail.

DeLorme and Watkins

DeLorme and Watkins developed their strength program by using a 10-repetition maximum (10RM) as the final goal of the trainees. This is a pretty simple set up. They recommended doing three sets of each exercise and then doing 10 repetitions each time. By today’s standards, it would be difficult to develop maximum strength using the system and you will soon see why.

After an overall body warm-up, you do your first set at 50% of the 10-repetition maximum. The second set follows at 75% of the 10-rep maximum. The final set is another 10 repetitions at 100% of the 10-repetition maximum.

Even a casual glance at this schedule reveals the difficulty in achieving a true 10-repetition maximum on the third set. Nevertheless, in a therapeutic setting this was years ahead of what they had been doing prior 1948. Dr. Zinovieff identified the inherent disadvantages of the DeLorme and Watkins progressive system and modified it. He renamed it the Oxford technique.

The Oxford technique

As could be expected, once a trainee who was following the DeLorme and Watkins program reached the third set they were in a fatigued state and were probably unable to finish the repetitions. Dr. Zinovieff reversed the number of required repetitions and the percentages by starting at 100% with 10 repetitions for the first set. He then followed with the second set at 75%. The final set was 50% of the 10-repetition maximum.

This seems to make much more sense in that the first set of 10 is done when you are in a rested state. As you progress through the following two sets, with fatigue beginning to set in, the percentages are lowered to accommodate the declining physical ability.

Three, ultraconservative, exercise progression systems

Daily Adjusted Progressive Resistive Exercise (DAPRE) technique

This system is now more frequently used than either of the prior two. It is a complex program of exercising six days a week. This may seem like a lot but it is designed to meet each person’s ability to bear the increased resistance based upon which set is being performed in the schedule.

The important part of this program is realized in sets three and four, but before getting there, we still have to do sets one and two. Set one is 10 repetitions at 50% of the anticipated 100% 10 repetition maximum. The second set is six repetitions the 75%.

The third set is as many repetitions the individual is capable of making at 100% of the 10 repetition maximum. The fourth set is again as many reps as possible. This is based on an adjustment determined from set number three.

The adjustment guidelines are somewhat complicated so here is a brief chart for you to look at and decipher at your leisure.

Guidelines for the fourth set

Number of repetitions from the prior set

Fourth set load based upon set three repetitions

Next day training load adjustments based upon the fourth load set

0–2

Lower the weight and redo the set

Lower the weight and redo the last set performed

3-4

Lower the weight by at least 5 pounds

Keep the same weight

5-7

Keep the weight

Increase the weight by 5 to 10 pounds

8-12

Increase the load by 5 to 10 pounds

Increase the weight 5 to 15 pounds

More than 13 repetitions

Increase the load by 10 to 15 pounds

Increase the weight 10 to 20 pounds

Three, ultraconservative, exercise progression systems

As can be seen by looking at the chart it is not as simple as just performing 50, 75, and 100% of the 10 repetition max load. To me, this repetition scheme makes sense, especially if you are coming back from an injury. This program is both conservative and aggressive at the same time.

The determining factor for improving strength rests solely upon the trainees’ shoulders. Highly motivated trainees are going to do as many repetitions as possible in sets three and four, whereas the less motivated will do just enough to get by. The latter will pay a price later on for not pushing themselves to get the strongest possible during the process.

Research conducted in 2003 , compared DeLorme and Watkins with the Oxford technique, concluded that it was unclear which technique was more effective at developing strength. However, there was no mention of active recovery, which each of these three programs could do very well at fulfilling.

Adapted from Therapeutic Exercise for Athletic Injuries and chart based on Knight, 1985

Comparison of DeLorme with Oxford techniques. Am J Phys Med Rehabil 2003;82:903-909.

080816 Protect your memory by staying at a healthy weight

080816 Protect your memory by staying at a healthy weight

New research recently published in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society found a link between weight and memory loss in older women. An analysis of data gathered from 8,745 women, aged 65-79, showed no signs of dementia at the beginning of this study. Things changed.

Throughout the study, periodic body mass index (BMI) measurements were taken on the participants.

The researchers found that for every increase in the BMI unit, memory loss also increased when measured from the memory test. This is not unexpected.

Clearly, from all the scientific studies conducted over the years, there is a direct link between excess body fat and heart disease. The fact is that for every risk for cardiovascular disease there is also a risk for Alzheimer’s disease. Therefore, the findings were not inconsistent with other data gathered relating to weight gain, cardiovascular health, dementia and Alzheimer’s disease.

The question may arise as to what is a good BMI number. The standard reply is between 18.5 for a normal weight, 24.9; 25-29.9 is considered overweight and 30 plus is obese. However, these numbers should be viewed with caution if you are athletic and muscular. For the purposes of the study, the women were neither athletic nor muscular.

Some dietitians believe that individuals over seventy may be better off if their BMI scores are slightly higher, i.e. 25-27, than recommended by the BMI charts. The reasoning behind this lies in the definition of the ideal weight, which can change, as we get older.

Shedding weight does not seem complicated; eat less, exercise more. However, there is more to it than that. There are dietary changes one can make in cutting weight safely. Putting these changes into effect is another matter though. Here are few ideas to help.

Enjoy frequent but smaller nutritionally balanced meals.
Leave fried foods off the menu.
Eat more fruits, whole grains, and vegetables. These foods add more fiber to your diet.
When cooking, use canola or olive oils. They are healthy monounsaturated fats that your body needs to function.
If you are over fifty, add more lean proteins such as chicken and turkey, without the skin and fish.
Cut back on the simple sugars in your diet. Consider whether you actually need that pop or sugar based fruit drink. You probably don’t.

To get a kick start in losing weight begin with a daily log of what you eat and drink. These diaries help maintain the focus on healthy eating and make you accountable for the calories going into your body each day.

Additional actions that will lower your BMI are aerobic and anaerobic exercise five to six days a week. Not only will exercise help with weight loss but it can help raise your energy levels, lower your blood pressure, LDL cholesterol, blood sugar and triglycerides.

You may be thinking that losing a lot of weight until you are under the BMI recommendations would be even better. However, this is not the case.

If you are under the numbers on the chart, you may be at risk of being or becoming malnourished, which can lead to other health related issues such as osteoporosis.

Admittedly, some older citizens may unintentionally be losing weight by not be eating enough nutrients due to poor teeth or dentures, decreased appetite, and in certain instances difficulty in swallowing their food. If this is your case, see your doctor. If not then consider eating more frequently each day.

Eating smaller, but balanced, meals five to six times throughout the day will help you gain weight. Foods such as fish, legumes, nuts, poultry and whole grains taste great and make it easier to add the calories to your diet.

If you are still unable to lose that excess fat then it is time to seek the counsel of a registered dietician. These professionals will closely examine your habits, lifestyle, overall health then create a well thought out outline for you to follow in regaining your health.

Not only will losing weight help to keep your memory intact it also contributes to less pain in the joints, lower cholesterol, blood pressure, blood sugar control, which assists in diabetes and cardio management.

010816 Make your workouts more productive

010816 Make your workouts more productive

Commit to working out with a good training partner

Many people who want to work out find that exercising is more productive when they do it with a friend. This leads to competition during the period. Unless you are highly self-motivated, it’s easier to make an excuse and not exercise your hardest if you are doing it by yourself. However, with a friend, it is more likely that you will follow through because you don’t want to be a pansy.

You only cheat yourself by not working hard or even worse, missing a session.

Find a gym that fits your personality

Some gyms are exhibition halls of tank tops and spandex for the younger crowd. If you are not already in good shape, these may be intimidating. Men and women do not want to go into these gyms because feel like they are a course on the body buffet. The point being is you want to be comfortable with those around you while you’re exercising. This means you want to be with people similar in age, overall appearance and exercise ability.

Hire a trainer or instructor.

If you have never exercised before, or if you used to exercise three or more years in the past, then first up would be a hirer a trainer because things have changed. When doing so, ask them what certifications and qualifications they have. The top certifications are from the National Strength and Conditioning Association (NSCA) and the American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM). These trainers can show you how to use the equipment the correct way. This minimizes your exposure to injury.

They will guide you along in developing excellent technique for each of the exercises. Once you become somewhat familiar with doing them, you are going to be enjoying yourself more in the gym. You don’t have to be with these trainers forever, but do learn the basics and then strike out in your own. Periodically it might be wise to hook back up with the trainer just to check out how you doing with your exercise technique and your program.

Pick activities you like to do

Your interest in the exercise is going to determine whether you stick with it. If you feel like walking, then walk. If you like to socialize then get involved with a socializing activity such as bowling or some sort of recreational league sport. If you want to get stronger, then lift and cut the jawboning. All this does is cuts into the exercise time with unproductive results and at worse take up air someone else could be using. That being said, if all you want to do is socialize then go to a gym with lots of machines. They take no brains or instructions to use and are ideal for idle chitchat.

If you like constant movement, try some dancing or endurance running. Strength training can be both a social and individually focused activity, depending on your ultimate goal. If social, go to a social club and leave the hardcore lifters to a hardcore gym.

End each session with something challenging

If you find that doing Bulgarian split squats is something that, even though you know are highly beneficial, but really don’t like to do, then get those out of the way right off the bat when you’re fresh and eager. This serves you in two ways: one, the exercise is over and secondly you know that the rest of the workout is going to be more fun now that they are done. You can now leave the gym with good memories of doing your last exercises.

Keep records

Keeping an exercise logbook is essential to tracking your progress and for successfully reaching your goals. You can get as detailed as you want by listing things that you eat, drink, the quality of your sleep, the number of hours you slept, how you felt doing exercise, the weight used, the repetitions performed, the sequence of the session, how much you weigh going in and leaving, the restorative methods used… This record keeping is up to you. If you use it, it will serve you well.

By following these tips, you will set yourself up for success in achieving your exercise goals each day, each week, and each month.

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